post-image

Which of the NHS’ vets are in the news?

Industry

6 November, 2018 08:08:00 The health service has been forced to defend itself against accusations of bias after an investigation found a vet in Cardiff had written to a GP in an attempt to get the animal’s name changed to “Lionheart”.

The vet was one of three that wrote the letter, the Daily Mail reported.

The GP in question is not named in the article.

The Daily Mail’s coverage of the investigation has included claims that the vets had not been given a chance to be heard.

The department told the newspaper it would be “very unusual” for a GP to send an email without being told about it.

But the report found a number of vets had been given the email, which included the request for an appointment with the animal.

It also found the vets’ emails were being sent without a “meaningful discussion” with the GP.

The investigation was prompted by complaints by an animal rights group, which alleged that a vet’s “lack of consideration” had been used to “change the name of an animal to ‘LionHeart'”.

In an email sent to Dr Nick Dolan, the veterinary assistant to the GP, the vet asked to be identified as “Lincoln” and to be “named”.

The letter, which was addressed to the Cardiff Veterinary Association, the Welsh Veterinary Association and the Welsh Society of Veterinary Surgeons, said: “I would like to see the name ‘Lincoln’ changed to ‘Growl’.

I am not sure if this is appropriate for the GP’s email, and I have not seen a reason why it should be.”

Lincoln, as I have seen it before, is a common name, and if you could please contact me to ask about it I would be more than happy to discuss it.

“Thank you for your attention and consideration.”

A spokesperson for the Welsh Department of Health said: The Welsh Veterinary Associations have a clear role to play in the selection of vets in the Welsh Government and its Welsh Government Veterinary Services (VSDV) and the appointment of vets across Wales.

They also have a statutory duty to inform the Welsh Ministers of the appointment and the circumstances of the vacancy in a timely manner.

We will not tolerate any form of discrimination against anyone and will take any complaints of this nature very seriously.

The Welsh Government says it is reviewing its process for appointing vets to the Welsh VSDV and will not beifying vets before any changes are made. “

This is a serious matter and we are taking action.”

The Welsh Government says it is reviewing its process for appointing vets to the Welsh VSDV and will not beifying vets before any changes are made.

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs said it would investigate the matter.

The Veterinary Association of Wales says it had been warned of the letter and the investigation and has asked for the names of the vets who sent it.

The organisation said the vets are entitled to be told about the procedure before it is changed.

It has been told the department is now looking into whether the vets could have done more to get vets to “take the time to understand” what the letter said.

The Welsh Department said: We will be looking at all aspects of the process that vets take before they are appointed and we will take every measure to ensure that any changes to the name are made as quickly as possible.

The VSDVS said it was disappointed by the report, which it said was not evidence of the “disregard for the welfare and dignity” of animals. “

In this case we have made clear that the letter did not come from a GP, but from a vet who had written it and it was not put into writing until after vets were told they were being offered an appointment.”

The VSDVS said it was disappointed by the report, which it said was not evidence of the “disregard for the welfare and dignity” of animals.

A Welsh Government spokesperson said: Veterinary organisations in Wales, as well as the Welsh government and Welsh VSSV, have a responsibility to the public to protect the welfare of their animals.

The report said the Welsh vet association was “extremely concerned” by the letter.

The VSSVS said vets were not the only ones who have been written letters in this way, and it would not be surprised if the Welsh public received letters from vets in other parts of Wales in the future.

The Wales Veterinary Association said it had received similar letters in the past and had always tried to make sure that vet names were changed to reflect the needs of the animal and not to avoid “name change” as the practice was illegal.

Tags: